Vacation Time

Everyone needs a break from the hustle and bustle of his or her everyday routine. Whether you are working a 40-hour a week job, being a house-mom, volunteering or even retired, we all like to get out and get away from our usual environment and take a vacation – and especially right now has many Covid-19 restrictions are being lifted all across the country. Trips to the big city, camping, theme parks and national and state parks are just a few of the multitude of possibilities for a family vacation.

            For people with disabilities, just a smidgen of planning ahead can prevent heartbreak, disappointment and potentially risky situations. Most attractions, such as theme and national parks have made their sites accessible to the disabled thanks to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Yet, due to a variety of issues and unforeseen circumstances, what is available to the able-bodied individual may vary somewhat from what is available to the disabled traveler.

            When making hotel/motel reservations, always ask the manager of the facility to describe “handicapped” rooms. What works for the “average” traveler may not work for you. In my travels across the nation, it’s not uncommon to reserve a room only to find out that my wheelchair cannot get through the bathroom door. There’s no such thing as “over planning.”

            If flying, try to take very necessary items with you in your carry-on luggage. Especially remember your essential medications. If your regular luggage should happen to get lost or end up on another flight, you will probably be a little more at ease.

            For more information on vacationing with the disabled, call 888-503-7955 or email us at info@maysmission.org for our brochure, “The Disabled Traveler.” Have fun and be safe!

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